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Trude Pettersen

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Trude Pettersen is associate editor of BarentsObserver and is based at the desk in Kirkenes, Northern Norway. She has been working for the Norwegian Barents Secretariat since 2008. 

Trude graduated from the University of Tromsø in 2000 with a MA degree in Russian. She has also studied International Politics and Russia and Eastern Europe Area Studies. 

Content by Trude Pettersen

The Russian Navy’s Kirov class nuclear-powered battlecruiser “Admiral Nakhimov” is to undergo overhaul and modernization. When ready for service in 2018, it will become the most powerful surface warship in the world, the designer says.

With some of the most beautiful of Norwegian, Russian and Latvian orchestra music on the repertoire, Arkhangelsk State Chamber Orchestra and the Norwegian saxophonist Ola Asdahl Rokkones are ready for a tour through Norway and Russia.

Russia’s strategic nuclear-powered submarine “Yury Dolgoruky” on Wednesday test-launched a Bulava ballistic missile from the Barents Sea.

The Sami Council, which is an umbrella organization for Sami organizations in Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia, has agreed that there is a need for Sami to be present in the EU capital of Brussels and plans to establish an office there.

Norwegian state-owned coal mining company Store Norske on the Svalbard archipelago is in a serious situation because of low prices on coal. The company is now in dialogue with the State, employees and the bank to secure further operations in 2015.

ROVANIEMI: Amidst growing competition on the media market, twelve newspapers in Northern and Western Finland have established a joint newsroom to produce national and international content for nearly 2 million readers.

The Russian artist Aleksander Florensky has written his own ironic version of 19. century travelogues describing more or less curious facts about the places being visited and with drawings by the author himself.

Rørbua, Norway’s first free administration building after World War II and the 1944 tunnel, where 3500 people were hiding during the last days of the war, were both declared preserved at a ceremony on Saturday.

“Norway has never forgotten, and will never forget, the contribution our Russian neighbor gave to our

Head of the Barents Institute Marianne Neerland Soleim on Saturday will receive President Putin’s letter of appreciation for her effort to identify Soviet prisoners of war who died in German camps in Norway.