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Trude Pettersen

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Trude Pettersen is associate editor of BarentsObserver and is based at the desk in Kirkenes, Northern Norway. She has been working for the Norwegian Barents Secretariat since 2008. 

Trude graduated from the University of Tromsø in 2000 with a MA degree in Russian. She has also studied International Politics and Russia and Eastern Europe Area Studies. 

Content by Trude Pettersen

Russia’s closest neighbour to Norway, the municipality of Pechenga, has started reindeer husbandry on the Rybachy Peninsula, and plans to open a base for tourists.

A Russian airliner offers a special “Eclipse Flight” from Murmansk to watch the total solar eclipse on March 20.

More than 100 planes from eight countries will take part in the Arctic Challenge Exercise that takes place in the skies of the Barents Region in May.

Two important regions in Russia’s Arctic ambitions – Murmansk and Yamalo-Nenets, have signed an agreement on cooperation.

Development of tourism is one of Russia’s prioritized areas to secure its presence on the archipelago of Svalbard. The state company Trust Arktikugol is now registered as a tour operator and could welcome its first guests to the Arctic wilderness.

Vladimir Potanin, CEO of Norilsk Nickel has become Russia’s wealthiest businessman with an estimated fortune of $15.4 billion.

Russian households’ spending on food products will increase to 50-55% of total expenses in 2015.

The UK needs to up its game in the Arctic or risk being «outmaneuvered” by other states, and should start by appointing an ambassador to the region, according to a report by the House of Lords Arctic Committee.

Could the Northern Sea Route be suitable for shipment of fish from the Far East to the European parts of Russia and vice versa? Stake holders in Russia’s fisheries industry and fishery authorities believe so.

Russia is prepared to protect its interests in the Arctic with military means if necessary, says Minister of Defense Sergey Shoygu, pointing to the increasing interest in the region’s resources by countries with no direct access to the Arctic.